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Camera Sense Archives

Resisting Documentary Photography

When most people pick up a camera it is to document people and places—to record events as they occur. This is the seductive aspect of photography which often becomes an imposing limitation for Fine Art photographers . . .

 

Balancing the Photographic Trinity: Aperture, Shutter Speed & ISO

New students to photography may be perplexed by the “trinity” of image making: aperture, shutter speed, and ISO . . .

 

Shallow depth-of-field: Trend or Useful technique?

When 35mm was the ubiquitous format in photography, shallow depth-of-field was normal. The challenge then was to achieve deep focus. Today the reverse is true. The advent of point-and-shoot cameras and cellphone photography have established extensive depth-of-field as the norm.

 

Photographers studying outstanding photographs can learn much about the technical essentials of image making (such as dynamic range, when to emphasize contrast, how to control lighting, etc.) from both reproductions and originals, but more importantly they can gain a deeper understanding as to why one photograph is extraordinary and communicates a great truth while others merely titillate.

 

Today’s camera or smartphone does so much automatically—no need to measure with a light meter or adjust shutter speed, aperture, and focus accurately to obtain an excellent exposure—that it is easy to assume that the craft of photography is being lost to time because of technological “advances.” . . .

 

The Artist Photographer

I have always loved to draw. My love of drawing ushered me to painting and illustration. However, when I was in my late teens I was also intrigued by photography. But being unable to afford a camera I did not fully explore my interest in photography . . .

 

Film Again, Film Again, Jiggety Jig

The other day I heard a photographer extolling the virtues of shooting with film. He was experimenting by shooting film and working “old school” with a manual camera—no autofocus, no LCD on the back for instant feedback, no 6 frames-per-second burst, and no light meter . . .

 

Seizing the Intuitive Moment

One challenge that I am confronted with again and again is being able to respond when something special that catches my eye—when that intuitive spark flashes—to not hesitate, just to take the shot. . .

 

“…since the early 1950’s, since the advent of commercial television, there have been 80 formats of video to-date. And most of them cannot be played anymore because the machines simply don’t exist.”